0

Timeshare scams cost thousands

If you’ve been thinking about getting out of your timeshare, it’s not as easy as you may think. Scammers prey on timeshare owners, especially those trying to sell.

“You could go anywhere in the world you wanted to- supposedly,” said previous timeshare owner Joe Hayes.
In the beginning, the worldwide timeshare was a great choice for Hayes and his wife.

“We utilized those resources and saw a fair share of the world,” he said. “Not all of it by any means, but a fair share.”

Sorry, you’ll need to log in to view this content.

0

Are timeshares a bad idea?

Dear Dave: My wife and I recently sat through a timeshare pitch at my mom and dad’s community as a favor to them. We’re trying to get out of debt and take control of our money, so when the salesman said we could put the whole thing on a credit card, I told him about you and your plan. He then said that he used to be your personal financial adviser and had sold you three timeshares in the past. Is this true, or are timeshares a bad idea? — Jeremy

Sorry, you’ll need to log in to view this content.

0

Campbell County couple has trouble with point-based timeshare

Imagine taking out a $12,000 loan on a timeshare and then finding yourself unable to use it and take a vacation. That happened to a Campbell County couple.

Timeshares are a big business in East Tennessee. You only have to visit Gatlinburg or Pigeon Forge once and you’ll likely run into a timeshare salesperson. For many years, fixed-weeks timeshares were popular wherein you pay for a certain number of weeks per year.

Many are now selling timeshares based on points as it’s said to be a more flexible alternative. In a points system, you can add to or build up your points by buying more of them or exchanging them for a more exotic location. Jerry and Tessa Hayes just wanted to take a vacation with the points they had bought.

The hard-working couple enjoys life and often has their children and grandchildren join them when they go on vacation. Last February in Pigeon Forge, they were approached by a salesman as they were leaving a restaurant.

“He wanted us to sign up for a timeshare,” said Jerry Hayes.

Read the full story at:

Campbell County couple has trouble with point-based timeshare

0

Woman loses $15,000 in timeshare scam

Most of us would love to take a vacation right now to get away to somewhere warm! Wouldn’t it be great to own a timeshare? Maybe not!

“The best thing to do is if you hear timeshare, run the other way,” Esther Bilicki said.

Bilicki is speaking from experience. She lost more than $15,000 in a timeshare scam.

“They wanted to help us sell the timeshare so we didn`t have to worry about anything. They would take care of everything,” Bilicki said.

The company was called National Timeshare Resales.

“They made a lot of misrepresentations in convincing the people they would get their timeshare sold for them. They would just need to pay upfront fee ranging from $500- $2,500,” U.S. Postal Inspector Derick Thieme said.

The company lured people in by claiming they already had a seller on the line.

“Convince them they had a buyer for their timeshare and this was an imminent sale type deal, and they could help them get rid of the timeshare so they wouldn`t be responsible for the fees and maintenance costs,” Thieme said.

 

Sorry, you’ll need to log in to view this content.

0

A timeshare salesman my adviser? I think not

Dear Dave: My wife and I recently sat through a timeshare pitch at my mom and dad’s community as a favor to them. We’re trying to get out of debt and take control of our money, so when the salesman said we could put the whole thing on a credit card, I told him about you and your plan. He then said that he used to be your personal financial advisor and had sold you three timeshares in the past. Is this true, or are timeshares a bad idea? — Jeremy

Dear Jeremy: A timeshare salesman said he had been my personal financial advisor? Wow! It takes real guts, and a bunch of dishonest nerve, to spread that kind of crap around.

No, I’ve never in my life owned a timeshare. I’ve made just about every financial mistake known to man, except that one. I’ve also never made the mistake of having a timeshare salesman as my financial advisor. This sounds like the kind of guy who you know is lying if his lips are moving!

I’m really sorry if your mom and dad already hooked up with this bunch. Timeshares, even with honest salespeople, are just straight-up stupid. Never buy a timeshare! The customer dissatisfaction rate with those things is sky-high, and you’re pretty much stuck once you buy one. They’re almost impossible to sell, because you don’t really own anything.

For the money you spend to buy a timeshare, you could take several nice vacations and stay in some pretty decent places. People get suckered in to these things all the time, Jeremy, but it’s a really bad idea. Don’t do it! — Dave

Read the rest at:

http://www.decaturdaily.com/business/a-timeshare-salesman-my-adviser-i-think-not/article_c8f57c67-4e86-5a4c-a810-bc28eab54d02.html